View From The Balcony
Sent a message to a G.I.
In the desert
Said thank you man for bringin’ another dawn.
from “Weird World” by Backstreet Boys

fascinating. 3 front pages. 3 photos. 1 story.

washingtonpoststyle:

Today, in three front pages.

Here’s how and why the photo editors at three different papers chose three different photos to illustrate the same event.

npr:

Lance Cpl. Jake Romo does physical therapy at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Calif. He lost both legs in an explosion in Sangin, Afghanistan, in February 2011, while serving with the 3/5 Marines. Photo by NPR’s David Gilkey. (Taken with instagram)

npr:

Lance Cpl. Jake Romo does physical therapy at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Calif. He lost both legs in an explosion in Sangin, Afghanistan, in February 2011, while serving with the 3/5 Marines. Photo by NPR’s David Gilkey. (Taken with instagram)

life:

U.S. Army soldiers line up to drink from a cup of wine while celebrating communion with Catholic chaplain Cpt. Carl Subler, Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan.
U.S. military personnel in Afghanistan and Iraq are prohibited from drinking alcohol while on deployment, although exceptions are made for religious services such as Mass.
(see more — Faith on the Front Lines: Afghanistan)

life:

U.S. Army soldiers line up to drink from a cup of wine while celebrating communion with Catholic chaplain Cpt. Carl Subler, Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan.

U.S. military personnel in Afghanistan and Iraq are prohibited from drinking alcohol while on deployment, although exceptions are made for religious services such as Mass.

(see moreFaith on the Front Lines: Afghanistan)

Via @jimmydcarr, an extraordinary cub journalist.

One of the things that we as a country are learning is that people who are wounded in war are wounded forever.
On Thursday’s Fresh Air, veteran combat reporter David Wood talks about some of the challenges that severely wounded soldiers face when they return home from Afghanistan and Iraq. (via nprfreshair)
futurejournalismproject:

Ten Years in Afghanistan
New York Times photographer Tyler Hicks has — among other assignments — has spent ten years photographing the Afghan war.
On the Times’ Lens blog is a slide show of his work about which Hicks writes:

I do it because I am photographer. I am a photographer working for a newspaper, and to ignore this American war, or any other war that we are involved in, would be an unfulfilling way for me to work. It’s an important issue to document: America is involved in more wars at one time that it has been in its history, and I feel it is not just a job but an obligation to document it, and not only for each day’s readers of the newspaper but for the people who will reflect on these conflicts 10 years, 20 years or 100 years from now.

Image: Afghan soldiers search a home in the Chabaran Valley, September 2011 — Tyler Hicks

futurejournalismproject:

Ten Years in Afghanistan

New York Times photographer Tyler Hicks has — among other assignments — has spent ten years photographing the Afghan war.

On the Times’ Lens blog is a slide show of his work about which Hicks writes:

I do it because I am photographer. I am a photographer working for a newspaper, and to ignore this American war, or any other war that we are involved in, would be an unfulfilling way for me to work. It’s an important issue to document: America is involved in more wars at one time that it has been in its history, and I feel it is not just a job but an obligation to document it, and not only for each day’s readers of the newspaper but for the people who will reflect on these conflicts 10 years, 20 years or 100 years from now.

Image: Afghan soldiers search a home in the Chabaran Valley, September 2011 — Tyler Hicks

theatlantic:

Afghanistan: August 2011

US Army Flight Medic Brandon Lowther (left) holds the hand of a fatally wounded US army soldier as he is airlifted by the Medevac helicopter of 159th Brigade Task Force Thunder, on August 24, 2011, to Kandahar Hospital Role 3. Two US soldiers were heavily injured by gun shots and brought to the hospital. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

Just in case you forgot there’s a war on. See more vivid photos at In Focus

theatlantic:

Afghanistan: August 2011

US Army Flight Medic Brandon Lowther (left) holds the hand of a fatally wounded US army soldier as he is airlifted by the Medevac helicopter of 159th Brigade Task Force Thunder, on August 24, 2011, to Kandahar Hospital Role 3. Two US soldiers were heavily injured by gun shots and brought to the hospital. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

Just in case you forgot there’s a war on. See more vivid photos at In Focus

theatlantic:

The Atlantic editor-at-large Steve Clemons has a close call in Kabul

I look pretty ragged in this pic because it was a ragged morning, blogging about the bombings and gunfights in Kabul this morning.  The British Council offices in Kabul were attacked by insurgents on a national holiday commemorating Afghanistan’s independence from Great Britain. The bullet in my hand is one of several that came my way as I stupidly stood out on a patio roof blogging.  

theatlantic:

The Atlantic editor-at-large Steve Clemons has a close call in Kabul

I look pretty ragged in this pic because it was a ragged morning, blogging about the bombings and gunfights in Kabul this morning.  The British Council offices in Kabul were attacked by insurgents on a national holiday commemorating Afghanistan’s independence from Great Britain. The bullet in my hand is one of several that came my way as I stupidly stood out on a patio roof blogging.  

futurejournalismproject:

Visualizing ten years of violence against journalists in Afghanistan
Via MediaShift:

Internews and Nai, an Afghan media advocacy organization, have collected hundreds of reports of threats, intimidation, and violence faced by journalists in Afghanistan. We recently announced a new site, data.nai.org.af, which features 10 years of these reports. While Nai’s data previously resided in spreadsheets, the new site allows the public to access hundreds of reports through visualizations and to download it directly. With this site we’re raising the profile of media freedom in a country often characterized as among the most dangerous in the world for journalists.

Take, for example, the case of Omaid Khpalwak, a reporter with Pajhwok Afghan News who died recently in an attack on Tarin Kot, capital of Uruzgan.
Freelance journalists are among the top five groups experiencing violence. The others are formal news organizations.
For data wranglers, Internews and Nai are releasing the data in .csv and .geoJSON formats.
You can explore the infographic and export the data here. 

futurejournalismproject:

Visualizing ten years of violence against journalists in Afghanistan

Via MediaShift:

Internews and Nai, an Afghan media advocacy organization, have collected hundreds of reports of threats, intimidation, and violence faced by journalists in Afghanistan. We recently announced a new site, data.nai.org.af, which features 10 years of these reports. While Nai’s data previously resided in spreadsheets, the new site allows the public to access hundreds of reports through visualizations and to download it directly. With this site we’re raising the profile of media freedom in a country often characterized as among the most dangerous in the world for journalists.

Take, for example, the case of Omaid Khpalwak, a reporter with Pajhwok Afghan News who died recently in an attack on Tarin Kot, capital of Uruzgan.

Freelance journalists are among the top five groups experiencing violence. The others are formal news organizations.

For data wranglers, Internews and Nai are releasing the data in .csv and .geoJSON formats.

You can explore the infographic and export the data here